Monthly Archives: February 2016

For Better Or Worse, Chris Rock Made The Oscars As Black As He Possibly Could


Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock's razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate.i

Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock’s razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate.

Christopher Polk/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock's razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate.

Comedian Chris Rock hosting the Oscars on Sunday. Rock’s razor-sharp monologue skewered sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate.

Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Host Chris Rock made sure Sunday’s Oscars were about as black as they could be, given that no black people had been nominated in any high profile categories.

Of course, Rock brought the pain, as he always does, in a razor-sharp monologue skewering sensibilities on all sides of the #OscarsSoWhite debate. And his comedy bits throughout the show kept up a steady drumbeat, reminding audiences in the hall and at home just who had been left behind.

That meant TWO Suge Knight jokes, featuring the actor who played him in Straight Outta Compton. And a bit where Rock’s daughters joined a cadre of black girl scouts running into the audience to sell $65,000 worth of cookies. There was a man-on-the-street segment featuring mostly black filmgoers at a theater in Compton, California who hadn’t heard of most of the white-centered movies considered major contenders. And Rock gave a shout out to #blacklivesmatter at the show’s end, jokingly inviting the Oscars audience to the BET awards as Public Enemy’s Fight the Power played over the closing credits.

It was overall a virtuoso performance, a constant statement balancing the tony, liberal-tinged self-congratulation of a typical Oscars ceremony with the different world people of color — even those who go to see films regularly — beyond the bubble of Hollywood’s film elite.

But by emphasizing black exclusion so heavily, Rock’s comedy also overlooked the way other ethnic and racial minorities were also excluded from Oscar nominations and significant roles in high quality films.

A recent study shows that non-white Hispanics are by far the most underrepresented characters of color in film and television, while women and gay people also face significant marginalization. Still, most of the comedy about exclusion Sunday reduced the idea of diversity to a black and white issue — something that felt, ironically, a little exclusionary itself.

On social media, former Lost star Daniel Dae Kim wryly noted that Rock’s pretaped interviews at the Compton theater didn’t mention the underrepresentation of Asians and Latinos until nearly 2 minutes in. “At 1:57 a ‘man on the street’ finally mentions Asians & Hispanics. Grateful someone sees #diversity as more than just black & white,” he wrote.

Meanwhile, an opening montage of images from films of note this Oscar season featured black actors like Samuel L. Jackson, John Boyega, Idris Elba, Will Smith and Michael B. Jordan so prominently, it looked like a cavalcade of non-white people who should have been nominated. (“I counted at least 15 black people in that montage,” Rock joked when he first walked onstage.)

In one pre-taped video, Angela Bassett hosted an Oscars Black History Month Minute that sounded like a tribute to Will Smith — a “groundbreaking” producer, actor, comedian and musician — until she revealed the real subject: Jack Black. In another, Saturday Night Live‘s Leslie Jones and comic Tracy Morgan were inserted into clips from The Revenant and The Danish Girl as a way of giving black actors parts in big movies.

Rock earned waves of applause from the Oscars audience by joking black people didn’t protest exclusion from the Oscars in the 1960s “because we had real things to protest…too busy being raped and lynched to care about who won best cinematographer.” (Of course, as Code Switch’s Gene Demby noted recently, black people did protest exclusion in Hollywood at the 1962 Oscars, led by a black actor, Caleb Peterson.)

Moments later, crowd reaction was more muted when Rock said, “Is Hollywood racist? You’re damn right Hollywood’s racist…but it’s (racism) you’ve grown accustomed to. Hollywood is sorority racist. It’s like, ‘We like you, Rhonda. But you’re not a Kappa.’ That’s how Hollywood is.”

It was a delicate balancing act – edgy enough to make an impression throughout the show, but sly enough not to seem too overbearing.

Actress Stacey Dash walks on stage during the Oscars.i

Actress Stacey Dash walks on stage during the Oscars.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Actress Stacey Dash walks on stage during the Oscars.

Actress Stacey Dash walks on stage during the Oscars.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

There was also what might have been the show’s most awkward moment: An appearance from African-American actress-turned-conservative pundit Stacey Dash, who once opined on Fox News about the unfairness of Black History Month and Black Entertainment Television to white people. She was satirically announced as the director of the Oscar academy’s new minority outreach program, walking onstage to wave at the crowd in a bit many people in the audience and on social media didn’t seem to understand.

Outside of Rock’s comedy, the Oscars tried hard to look inclusive as possible. Presenters represented a wide range of ethnic groups, from Sofia Vergara and Priyanka Chopra to Byung-hun Lee and Kevin Hart. Academy president, Cheryl Boone Isaacs, and musical director Harold Wheeler are African-American, and their appearance reinforced the sense that there was ethnic diversity everywhere outside of the actual awards.

But there were some serious problems. Sacha Baron Cohen offered a line about the animated, yellow Minions characters from the Despicable Me franchise that recalled stereotypes about Asian sexual endowments, while Rock ushered three Asian children onstage saying they were the accountants handling Oscar votes, in an embarrassing nod to stereotypes about Asians being good at math.

Even one of the Oscars’ biggest moment of inclusion, in which Mexican director Alejandro Inarritu made history by winning a best director Academy Award for the second consecutive year for the first time in 65 years, came with a bit of an asterisk.

Host Chris Rock and children participate in a skit during the Oscars.i

Host Chris Rock and children participate in a skit during the Oscars.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Host Chris Rock and children participate in a skit during the Oscars.

Host Chris Rock and children participate in a skit during the Oscars.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

That’s because the film which earned Inarritu this year’s Oscar, The Revenant, featured Native American actors, but no notable black or Hispanic roles. His Oscar last year came for Birdman, a movie with no notable roles for non-white actors. The most-honored Hispanic film director in recent years hasn’t helped much with current Hispanic underrepresentation onscreen.

(Inarritu did note in his acceptance speech that he was “very lucky to be here tonight, but unfortunately many others haven’t had the same luck,” saying he hoped in the future skin color would be as unremarkable as the length of someone’s hair.)

It might be tempting to look back on the night as a roast of Hollywood’s film community, a parade of jibes about diversity that the industry will endure, only to return to business as usual when the dust clears. In a world where only white people have been nominated for acting Oscars two years running, that’s certainly a possibility.

But if there is anything Hollywood hates almost as much as not making money, it’s being humiliated in public. And Rock’s Oscars comedy was a public spanking so prolonged, it’s tough to imagine anyone in the business risking a similar replay next year.

With all its flaws, Rock’s turn as Oscars host provided a visceral look at the talent, comedy, lives and culture left out of Academy Award-level films when they exclude people of color. Here’s hoping that’s enough to keep the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from making the same mistakes of inclusion for a third year in a row.

Teen Girls And Social Media: A Story Of ‘Secret Lives’ And Misogyny


Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls.i

Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls.

Knopf


hide caption

toggle caption

Knopf

Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls.

Nancy Jo Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls about their social media and Internet habits while researching her book American Girls.

Knopf

Social media and dating apps are putting unprecedented pressures on America’s teen girls, author Nancy Jo Sales says. Her new book, American Girls, opens with a story about one 13-year-old who received an Instagram request for “noodz” [nude photos] from a boy she didn’t know very well.

“When I was a girl and the things that would come up in your life that were difficult or troubling or whatever — there was always a Judy Blume book for it,” Sales tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross. But, Sales says, when it comes to responding to an out-of-the-blue solicitation for naked images, “there’s no Judy Blume book for that. There’s nothing for them to turn to, to know, like, ‘how do I react to this?’ “

In the 2 1/2 years she spent researching her book, Sales interviewed more than 200 teenage girls around the country about their social media and Internet usage. She says girls face enormous pressures to post “hot” or sexualized photos of themselves online, and she adds that this pressure can make the Internet an unwelcoming environment.

“I think a lot of people are not aware of how the atmosphere has really changed in social situations … in terms of how the girls are treated and how the boys behave,” Sales says. “This is a kind of sexism and misogyny being played out in real time in this really extreme way.”

Interview Highlights

American Girls

Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers

by Nancy Jo Sales

Hardcover, 404 pages |

purchase

On how males’ and females’ pictures differ on Tinder

I talked to an 18-year-old girl who is talking about looking at Tinder with her older brother and … she said she was struck by the way in which the boys and men’s pictures were very different than the girls’. Guys tend to have a picture like, I don’t know, they’re standing on a mountain looking like they’ve climbed the mountain, or they’re holding a big fish or they’re doing something manly, or in their car. … But the girls’ pictures … tend to be very different; they tend to be a lot more sexualized.

This is a pressure on social media that goes back, for women and girls, a long time. … I trace the origins back to a site called “Hot or Not” which came out in 2000. … The whole idea of “hotness” has become such a factor in the lives of American girls, unfortunately, because according to many, many studies, including a really landmark report by the American Psychological Association in 2007, this has wide-ranging ramifications for girls’ health and well-being, including studies that link this pressure to sexualize on all kinds of things like rising anxiety, depression, cutting, eating disorders. It’s a thing that I don’t think that boys have to deal with as much.

On boys asking girls for nude photos

I think the fact that so often we’re talking about nudes and sexting is because kids are watching porn. There’s multiple studies that say that they are. We know that they are. They’re curious. They’re going through puberty. They’re watching porn. And yet, nobody really talks about it or talks about the fact that it has an effect on how they behave and what they think about sex and sexuality and how they deal with each other. And there’s really no guidelines for girls about how to react to all of this. …

Some 13-year-old girls in Florida and New Jersey both told me that if they didn’t they had been threatened with boys sending rumors about them, sending around a picture that actually wasn’t them and saying it was them. I mean, there’s a kind of thing in adult life that we know about called revenge porn, and that happens among kids as well, unfortunately.

It’s very risky for girls to send nudes because when they do, if they chose to, those photos are not private. They can be shared and very often they are shared. I heard story after story of situations where girls had pictures of themselves sent around to groups of people. It has become such a normal thing to them.

Nancy Jo Sales is also the author of The Bling Ring.i

Nancy Jo Sales is also the author of The Bling Ring.

Jayne Wexler/Knopf


hide caption

toggle caption

Jayne Wexler/Knopf

Nancy Jo Sales is also the author of The Bling Ring.

Nancy Jo Sales is also the author of The Bling Ring.

Jayne Wexler/Knopf

On ‘slut pages’

A “slut page” is when someone, typically a boy, not 100 percent of the time, but mostly a boy or boys, will collect nude photos of girls in their school or in the area’s schools and post them on a page. I’ve seen them on Facebook or Instagram. It looks like an amateur pornography site — it is an amateur pornography site, I would say — and it’s underage girls and pictures that are sent to someone, very often that they think won’t share them but who does. It’s a nonconsensual sharing of these pictures, and sometimes without their knowledge.

I’ve talked to girls who found out about it through text. Suddenly their phone blows up and they find out, “Oh my god, you’re on this page.” I think it’s very threatening because it’s abuse of a certain kind and it’s harassment, and it’s very often not punished in any way, or even known by adults.

On how porn is affecting sex

It was through talking to girls that I started thinking about porn, and they really enlightened me about the effect that porn was having on their lives, because they would start describing to me interactions that they had with boys. For example, “Send me nudes,” or a boy sending a nude picture of himself. … These things that they’re describing sound violent to me. They say, “[Boys] expect this, and they expect that, and they want you to do this, and they want you to do that.” And these things, they’re all the hallmarks of the most popular online porn.

There’s different things that are sort of popularized in porn. Pornographers have found that they get more traffic, more clicks, more views, whatever, the more extreme that it is. That seems to be the trend that has happened in porn in the last decade or so, right? So there are certain acts or moves or behaviors, whatever, which are filtering their way into the sexual encounters of teenage girls and boys.

A Big Night For ‘Spotlight,’ DiCaprio And Earned Discomfort


Leonardo DiCaprio and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu celebrate their awards on stage at the 88th Oscars on Sunday.i

Leonardo DiCaprio and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu celebrate their awards on stage at the 88th Oscars on Sunday.

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Leonardo DiCaprio and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu celebrate their awards on stage at the 88th Oscars on Sunday.

Leonardo DiCaprio and director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu celebrate their awards on stage at the 88th Oscars on Sunday.

Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

You can say this for Sunday night’s Oscars: It seemed like a lot of it was going to be about inclusion or lack thereof, and it was.

Back in 2012, Chris Rock presented the Oscar for best animated feature, explaining that he loved animation because it makes anything possible. “I love animation,” he said, “because in the world of animation, you can be anything you wanna be. If you’re a fat woman, you can play a skinny princess. If you’re a short, wimpy guy, you can play a tall gladiator. If you’re a white man, you can play an Arabian prince. And if you’re a black man, you can play a donkey or a zebra.”

He added, as if it were obvious, “You can’t play white, my God!” It was a rare moment of candor that woke up a typically sleepy evening.

Four years later, Rock might therefore have been the best possible person to host the Oscars, in a year when so much attention has been focused on the all-white acting nominees and the failure of Hollywood to make a very inclusive slate of films — and to recognize those films (and the people involved in them) when they’re made at all.

Some of what Rock did in his monologue was squarely aimed at Hollywood, including his opening remark that if the academy nominated the hosts, he wouldn’t even be there. But Rock then pivoted to a more ambivalent line of inquiry about how the Oscars have always been white, but people in the 1960s, for instance, didn’t protest those because they had more important concerns. They were, he said, “too busy being raped and lynched to care who won best cinematography.”

Not only is that observation in some ways ahistorical (NPR’s Gene Demby just wrote about Oscar protests over the exclusion of black actors stretching back decades), and not only did it draw anger almost immediately for implying there aren’t real things to protest anymore, but hearing the mostly white audience laugh and applaud at the idea that black people used to have “real things” to protest didn’t feel like it was a joke at the expense of the academy or the Oscars. It felt like it was a joke at the expense of the people who were objecting to the lack of nominees who weren’t white — people like Jada Pinkett Smith, whom Rock specifically mocked for saying she wouldn’t show up. He said she wasn’t invited anyway, much as he wasn’t invited to “Rihanna’s panties.”

Rock did go on to draw interesting lines between the idea of Hollywood as — as he put it — not “burning-cross racist” but “sorority racist,” likely to tell black people what he called the equivalent of, “We like you, Rhonda, but you’re not a Kappa.” But the thesis of the monologue — which, on the whole, was perhaps meant to walk a very, very fine line in terms of acknowledging the issue without alienating the room — seemed ultimately to be that Hollywood is racist, but that expending energy objecting to that fact is silly.

Shortly thereafter, Rock introduced actress and Fox News contributor Stacey Dash, who recently came under a lot of criticism for various things she’s said, including statements doubting the need for Black History Month. She was on stage only long enough for him to joke that she was newly in charge of the academy’s “minority outreach” and for her to wish everyone a happy Black History Month — and then she walked off the stage, grinning. By this time, the evening had turned distinctly uncomfortable, which perhaps was entirely the intent.

It’s noteworthy that this all takes place in such a different environment now, where reaction happens and is communicated in real time, such that the Twitter reaction in particular almost feels like part of the event itself. There was a sense of how that monologue was going over before he even completed it; that doesn’t seem like it’s going to make that job any easier in the coming years. And it’s already a pretty hard job, particularly in a year like this.

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.i

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Rock did raise issues of representation throughout, though, shouting out presenter Michael B. Jordan, the star of Creed, as a “shoulda-been nominee,” for instance, and doing a funny segment with mostly black moviegoers at a real movie theater, who demonstrated that they hadn’t seen and didn’t care about most of the films nominated for best picture. (Quite honestly, lots of white moviegoers wouldn’t either.) Kevin Hart, too, acknowledged actors of color who weren’t nominated before introducing The Weeknd to perform his nominated song from Fifty Shades of Grey.

But the Oscars ceremony has a way of writing its own awkward moments, as when the orchestra played off one of the winners for Mad Max: Fury Road just as he attempted to thank people from Namibia, where the film was made, or when they played off the winner for best documentary short as she explained that her film may help motivate a change in Pakistani law on honor killings. Both, by the way, involved “Ride of the Valkyries,” the get-lost music of the evening, which is not the most gentle of musical nudges, as Bugs Bunny learned so long ago.

And that was before a bizarre little skit involving Asian kids — one that didn’t land at all — made all the talk of diversity seem weirdly hollow. Cutting the skit could have provided enough time for the explanation of the law on honor killings, for instance.

The awards themselves were spread out from the beginning. Spotlight grabbed one early for its original screenplay, then awards followed for The Big Short for its adapted screenplay, The Revenant for its cinematography, Alicia Vikander of The Danish Girl for supporting actress.

The contender that started piling up awards, in fact, was Mad Max: Fury Road, for its hugely stylish production design, makeup, costumes, film editing, sound editing and sound mixing. The film had six Oscars before the halfway point of the broadcast. Given the fact that nobody really believed Mad Max was going to win best picture (and it even lost the visual effects prize to Ex Machina), this mishmash kept an early favorite from running away with the show, which was at least something of a bulwark against boredom.

Later, Bridge of Spies‘ Mark Rylance won as best supporting actor, continuing the wealth-spreading.

In the big categories handed out in the last push, Brie Larson won lead actress for Room, The Revenant won for its director, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, and its lead actor, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Spotlight, directed by Tom McCarthy, won best picture.

As always, there were segments that seemed like pointless filler designed to ensure the thing wouldn’t be brought in on time, like a needless walk-on by the Star Wars droids that elicited little response on Twitter, at least, other than from people who enjoyed watching Room‘s Jacob Tremblay get excited about it. (See also: Minions.)

There were surprises — a lot of folks expected to see Sylvester Stallone win best supporting actor for Creed and watched him lose to Rylance. And it’s surprising to hear any particularly affecting staging of a nominated song given how lackluster they often are, but Lady Gaga’s performance of “Til It Happens to You” from the documentary The Hunting Ground — a performance introduced by Vice President Joe Biden — got instant praise. And The Revenant director Inarritu, winning best director for the second year in a row, managed to defeat the band that tried to play him off as he expressed his hope for a world without prejudice.

Rock will take criticism for some jokes and be praised for others, but at the very least, he paid sustained attention for 3 1/2 hours, in front of a very large audience, to issues of inclusiveness in the academy and in Hollywood as applied to black people. It’s about three hours and 25 minutes more than some hosts would have paid before moving on to something else, and if it was uncomfortable at times, then perhaps that’s the downside of coming to the end of the era in which you could nominate 20 actors, have all of them be white, and expect that not to make your ceremony uncomfortable.

‘Spotlight’ Wins Best Picture At 2016 Academy Awards


The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.i

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Spotlight won the coveted Oscar for best picture when the 88th Academy Awards were handed out Sunday night in Hollywood, upsetting The Revenant and Mad Max: Fury Road, which entered the night with 12 and 10 nominations, respectively.

Mad Max: Fury Road just about swept the early categories, winning six Oscars, but The Revenant also took two of the top awards. Alejandro González Iñárritu won the prize for best director, giving him his second consecutive Oscar, and Leonardo DiCaprio won the Oscar for best actor in a leading role, his first.

Brie Larson won her first Oscar, taking the award for best leading actress, for her role in Room. Best supporting actress went to Alicia Vikander for The Danish Girl, and best supporting actor was won by Mark Rylance for his role in Bridge of Spies.

Our Pop Culture Happy Hour team of Linda Holmes, Glen Weldon, Stephen Thompson and Bob Mondello live-tweeted all the proceedings — from the red carpet to host Chris Rock’s opening monologue, until the last winner was called.

Our crew tweeted using the hashtag #NPROscars and also retweeted some of your contributions. You can review via the widget below, or right here on Twitter.

This year’s event is not without some controversy. When the nominations were announced on Jan. 14, several media outlets reported a lack of diversity among the nominees. Some celebrities even called for viewers to boycott Sunday’s airing of the Academy Awards, and the overall outrage over the exclusion of people of color got the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trending on Twitter.

These reactions ultimately led the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to make modifications to its voting process and declare, “The Board’s goal is to commit to doubling the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020.”

Host Chris Rock didn’t shy away from commenting on the issue in his opening monologue. He joked that the Oscars are otherwise known as “the white people’s choice awards” and said that if hosts were nominated, he wouldn’t have gotten the job — that it would have instead gone to Neil Patrick Harris.

In the list below, we’ve marked the winners in each category, in bold.

Categories

Picture

The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight

Actor in a Leading Role

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Matt Damon, The Martian
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

Director

Adam McKay, The Big Short
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant
Lenny Abrahamson, Room
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale, The Big Short
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Actress in a Supporting Role

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Rooney Mara, Carol
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

Animated Feature Film

Anomalisa
Boy and the World
Inside Out
Shaun the Sheep Movie
When Marnie Was There

Cinematography

Carol
The Hateful Eight
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Sicario

Costume Design

Carol
Cinderella
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant

Documentary (Feature)

Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom

Documentary (Short Subject)

Body Team 12
Chau, beyond the Lines
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Last Day of Freedom

Film Editing

The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Foreign Language Film

Embrace of the Serpent
Mustang
Son of Saul
Theeb
A War

Makeup and Hairstyling

Mad Max: Fury Road
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out
the Window and Disappeared
The Revenant

Original Score

Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Original Song

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction
“Simple Song #3,” Youth
“Til It Happens to You,” The Hunting Ground
“Writing’s on the Wall,” Spectre

Production Design

Bridge of Spies
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant

Short Film (Animated)

Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow

Short Film (Live-Action)

Ave Maria
Day One
Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)
Shok
Stutterer

Sound Editing

Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Sound Mixing

Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Visual Effects

Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

The Big Short
Brooklyn
Carol
The Martian
Room

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Bridge of Spies
Ex Machina
Inside Out
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton

A Big Night For ‘Spotlight,’ DiCaprio And Earned Discomfort


Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.i

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

You can say this for Sunday night’s Oscars: It seemed like a lot of it was going to be about inclusion or lack thereof, and it was.

Back in 2012, Chris Rock presented the Oscar for best animated feature, explaining that he loved animation because it makes anything possible. “I love animation,” he said, “because in the world of animation, you can be anything you wanna be. If you’re a fat woman, you can play a skinny princess. If you’re a short, wimpy guy, you can play a tall gladiator. If you’re a white man, you can play an Arabian prince. And if you’re a black man, you can play a donkey or a zebra.”

He added, as if it were obvious, “You can’t play white, my God!” It was a rare moment of candor that woke up a typically sleepy evening.

Four years later, Rock might therefore have been the best possible person to host the Oscars, in a year when so much attention has been focused on the all-white acting nominees and the failure of Hollywood to make a very inclusive slate of films — and to recognize those films (and the people involved in them) when they’re made at all.

Some of what Rock did in his monologue was squarely aimed at Hollywood, including his opening remark that if the academy nominated the hosts, he wouldn’t even be there. But Rock then pivoted to a more ambivalent line of inquiry about how the Oscars have always been white, but people in the 1960s, for instance, didn’t protest those because they had more important concerns. They were, he said, “too busy being raped and lynched to care who won best cinematography.”

Not only is that observation in some ways ahistorical (NPR’s Gene Demby just wrote about Oscar protests over the exclusion of black actors stretching back decades), and not only did it draw anger almost immediately for implying there aren’t real things to protest anymore, but hearing the mostly white audience laugh and applaud at the idea that black people used to have “real things” to protest didn’t feel like it was a joke at the expense of the academy or the Oscars. It felt like it was a joke at the expense of the people who were objecting to the lack of nominees who weren’t white — people like Jada Pinkett Smith, whom Rock specifically mocked for saying she wouldn’t show up. He said she wasn’t invited anyway, much as he wasn’t invited to “Rihanna’s panties.”

Rock did go on to draw interesting lines between the idea of Hollywood as — as he put it — not “burning-cross racist” but “sorority racist,” likely to tell black people what he called the equivalent of, “We like you, Rhonda, but you’re not a Kappa.” But the thesis of the monologue — which, on the whole, was perhaps meant to walk a very, very fine line in terms of acknowledging the issue without alienating the room — seemed ultimately to be that Hollywood is racist, but that expending energy objecting to that fact is silly.

Shortly thereafter, Rock introduced actress and Fox News contributor Stacey Dash, who recently came under a lot of criticism for various things she’s said, including statements doubting the need for Black History Month. She was on stage only long enough for him to joke that she was newly in charge of the academy’s “minority outreach” and for her to wish everyone a happy Black History Month — and then she walked off the stage, grinning. By this time, the evening had turned distinctly uncomfortable, which perhaps was entirely the intent.

It’s noteworthy that this all takes place in such a different environment now, where reaction happens and is communicated in real time, such that the Twitter reaction in particular almost feels like part of the event itself. There was a sense of how that monologue was going over before he even completed it; that doesn’t seem like it’s going to make that job any easier in the coming years. And it’s already a pretty hard job, particularly in a year like this.

Rock did raise issues of representation throughout, though, shouting out presenter Michael B. Jordan, the star of Creed, as a “shoulda-been nominee,” for instance, and doing a funny segment with mostly black moviegoers at a real movie theater, who demonstrated that they hadn’t seen and didn’t care about most of the films nominated for best picture. (Quite honestly, lots of white moviegoers wouldn’t either.) Kevin Hart, too, acknowledged actors of color who weren’t nominated before introducing The Weeknd to perform his nominated song from Fifty Shades of Grey.

But the Oscars ceremony has a way of writing its own awkward moments, as when the orchestra played off one of the winners for Mad Max: Fury Road just as he attempted to thank people from Namibia, where the film was made, or when they played off the winner for best documentary short as she explained that her film may help motivate a change in Pakistani law on honor killings. Both, by the way, involved “Ride of the Valkyries,” the get-lost music of the evening, which is not the most gentle of musical nudges, as Bugs Bunny learned so long ago.

And that was before a bizarre little skit involving Asian kids — one that didn’t land at all — made all the talk of diversity seem weirdly hollow. Cutting the skit could have provided enough time for the explanation of the law on honor killings, for instance.

The awards themselves were spread out from the beginning. Spotlight grabbed one early for its original screenplay, then awards followed for The Big Short for its adapted screenplay, The Revenant for its cinematography, Alicia Vikander of The Danish Girl for supporting actress.

The contender that started piling up awards, in fact, was Mad Max: Fury Road, for its hugely stylish production design, makeup, costumes, film editing, sound editing and sound mixing. The film had six Oscars before the halfway point of the broadcast. Given the fact that nobody really believed Mad Max was going to win best picture (and it even lost the visual effects prize to Ex Machina), this mishmash kept an early favorite from running away with the show, which was at least something of a bulwark against boredom.

Later, Bridge of Spies‘ Mark Rylance won as best supporting actor, continuing the wealth-spreading.

In the big categories handed out in the last push, Brie Larson won lead actress for Room, The Revenant won for its director, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, and its lead actor, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Spotlight, directed by Tom McCarthy, won best picture.

As always, there were segments that seemed like pointless filler designed to ensure the thing wouldn’t be brought in on time, like a needless walk-on by the Star Wars droids that elicited little response on Twitter, at least, other than from people who enjoyed watching Room‘s Jacob Tremblay get excited about it. (See also: Minions.)

There were surprises — a lot of folks expected to see Sylvester Stallone win best supporting actor for Creed and watched him lose to Rylance. And it’s surprising to hear any particularly affecting staging of a nominated song given how lackluster they often are, but Lady Gaga’s performance of “Til It Happens to You” from the documentary The Hunting Ground — a performance introduced by Vice President Joe Biden — got instant praise. And The Revenant director Inarritu, winning best director for the second year in a row, managed to defeat the band that tried to play him off as he expressed his hope for a world without prejudice.

Rock will take criticism for some jokes and be praised for others, but at the very least, he paid sustained attention for 3 1/2 hours, in front of a very large audience, to issues of inclusiveness in the academy and in Hollywood as applied to black people. It’s about three hours and 25 minutes more than some hosts would have paid before moving on to something else, and if it was uncomfortable at times, then perhaps that’s the downside of coming to the end of the era in which you could nominate 20 actors, have all of them be white, and expect that not to make your ceremony uncomfortable.

‘Spotlight’ Wins Best Picture At 2016 Academy Awards


The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.i

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

The cast and crew of Spotlight accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Spotlight won the coveted Oscar for best picture when the 88th Academy Awards were handed out Sunday night in Hollywood, upsetting The Revenant and Mad Max: Fury Road, which entered the night with 12 and 10 nominations, respectively.

Mad Max: Fury Road just about swept the early categories, winning six Oscars, but The Revenant also took two of the top awards. Alejandro González Iñárritu won the prize for best director, giving him his second consecutive Oscar, and Leonardo DiCaprio won the Oscar for best actor in a leading role, his first.

Brie Larson won her first Oscar, taking the award for best leading actress, for her role in Room. Best supporting actress went to Alicia Vikander for The Danish Girl, and best supporting actor was won by Mark Rylance for his role in Bridge of Spies.

Our Pop Culture Happy Hour team of Linda Holmes, Glen Weldon, Stephen Thompson and Bob Mondello live-tweeted all the proceedings — from the red carpet to host Chris Rock’s opening monologue, until the last winner was called.

Our crew tweeted using the hashtag #NPROscars and also retweeted some of your contributions. You can review via the widget below, or right here on Twitter.

This year’s event is not without some controversy. When the nominations were announced on Jan. 14, several media outlets reported a lack of diversity among the nominees. Some celebrities even called for viewers to boycott Sunday’s airing of the Academy Awards, and the overall outrage over the exclusion of people of color got the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trending on Twitter.

These reactions ultimately led the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to make modifications to its voting process and declare, “The Board’s goal is to commit to doubling the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020.”

Host Chris Rock didn’t shy away from commenting on the issue in his opening monologue. He joked that the Oscars are otherwise known as “the white people’s choice awards” and said that if hosts were nominated, he wouldn’t have gotten the job — that it would have instead gone to Neil Patrick Harris.

In the list below, we’ve marked the winners in each category, in bold.

Categories

Picture

The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight

Actor in a Leading Role

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Matt Damon, The Martian
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

Director

Adam McKay, The Big Short
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant
Lenny Abrahamson, Room
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale, The Big Short
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Actress in a Supporting Role

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Rooney Mara, Carol
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

Animated Feature Film

Anomalisa
Boy and the World
Inside Out
Shaun the Sheep Movie
When Marnie Was There

Cinematography

Carol
The Hateful Eight
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Sicario

Costume Design

Carol
Cinderella
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant

Documentary (Feature)

Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom

Documentary (Short Subject)

Body Team 12
Chau, beyond the Lines
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Last Day of Freedom

Film Editing

The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Foreign Language Film

Embrace of the Serpent
Mustang
Son of Saul
Theeb
A War

Makeup and Hairstyling

Mad Max: Fury Road
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out
the Window and Disappeared
The Revenant

Original Score

Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Original Song

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction
“Simple Song #3,” Youth
“Til It Happens to You,” The Hunting Ground
“Writing’s on the Wall,” Spectre

Production Design

Bridge of Spies
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant

Short Film (Animated)

Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow

Short Film (Live-Action)

Ave Maria
Day One
Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)
Shok
Stutterer

Sound Editing

Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Sound Mixing

Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Visual Effects

Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

The Big Short
Brooklyn
Carol
The Martian
Room

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Bridge of Spies
Ex Machina
Inside Out
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton

A Big Night For ‘Spotlight,’ DiCaprio And Earned Discomfort


Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.i

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Chris Rock hosted the Oscars on Sunday night, and he spent a lot of time on the issues of diversity the academy is facing.

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

You can say this for Sunday night’s Oscars: It seemed like a lot of it was going to be about inclusion or lack thereof, and it was.

Back in 2012, Chris Rock presented the Oscar for best animated feature, explaining that he loved animation because it makes anything possible. “I love animation,” he said, “because in the world of animation, you can be anything you wanna be. If you’re a fat woman, you can play a skinny princess. If you’re a short, wimpy guy, you can play a tall gladiator. If you’re a white man, you can play an Arabian prince. And if you’re a black man, you can play a donkey or a zebra.”

He added, as if it were obvious” “You can’t play white, my God!” It was a rare moment of candor that woke up a typically sleepy evening.

Four years later, Rock might therefore have been the best possible person to host the Oscars, in a year when so much attention has been focused on the all-white acting nominees and the failure of Hollywood to make a very inclusive slate of films — and to recognize those films (and the people involved in them) when they’re made at all.

Some of what Rock did in his monologue was squarely aimed at Hollywood, including his opening remark that if the Academy nominated the hosts, he wouldn’t even be there. But Rock then pivoted to a more ambivalent line of inquiry about how the Oscars have always been white, but people in the 1960s, for instance, didn’t protest those because they had more important concerns. They were, he said, “too busy being raped and lynched to care who won best cinematography.”

Not only is that observation in some ways ahistorical (NPR’s Gene Demby just wrote about Oscar protests over the exclusion of black actors stretching back decades), and not only did it draw anger almost immediately for implying there aren’t real things to protest anymore, but hearing the mostly white audience laugh and applaud at the idea that black people used to have “real things” to protest didn’t feel like it was a joke at the expense of the academy or the Oscars. It felt like it was a joke at the expense of the people who were objecting to the lack of nominees who weren’t white — people like Jada Pinkett Smith, whom Rock specifically mocked for saying she wouldn’t show up. He said she wasn’t invited anyway, much as he wasn’t invited to “Rihanna’s panties.”

Rock did go on to draw interesting lines between the idea of Hollywood as — as he put it — not “burning-cross racist” but “sorority racist,” likely to tell black people what he called the equivalent of, “We like you, Rhonda, but you’re not a Kappa.” But the thesis of the monologue — which, on the whole, was perhaps meant to walk a very, very fine line in terms of acknowledging the issue without alienating the room — seemed ultimately to be that Hollywood is racist, but expending energy objecting to that fact is silly.

Shortly thereafter, Rock introduced actress and Fox News contributor Stacey Dash, who recently came under a lot of criticism for various things she’s said, including statements doubting the need for Black History Month. She was on stage only long enough for him to joke that she was newly in charge of the academy’s “minority outreach” and for her to wish everyone a happy Black History Month — and then she walked off the stage, grinning. By this time, the evening had turned distinctly uncomfortable, which perhaps was entirely the intent.

It’s noteworthy that this all takes place in such a different environment now, where reaction happens and is communicated in real time, such that the Twitter reaction in particular almost feels like part of the event itself. There was a sense of how that monologue was going over before he even completed it; that doesn’t seem like it’s going to make that job any easier in the coming years. And it’s already a pretty hard job, particularly in a year like this.

Rock did raise issues of representation throughout, though, shouting out presenter Michael B. Jordan, the star of Creed, as a “shoulda-been nominee,” for instance, and doing a funny segment with mostly black moviegoers at a real movie theater, who demonstrated that they hadn’t seen and didn’t care about most of the films nominated for best picture. (Quite honestly, lots of white moviegoers wouldn’t either.) Kevin Hart, too, acknowledged actors of color who weren’t nominated before introducing The Weeknd to perform his nominated song from Fifty Shades Of Grey.

But the Oscars ceremony has a way of writing its own awkward moments, as when the orchestra played off one of the winners for Mad Max: Fury Road just as he attempted to thank people from Namibia, where the film was made, or when they played off the winner for best documentary short as she explained that her film may help motivate a change in Pakistani law on honor killings. Both, by the way, involved “Ride Of The Valkyries,” the get-lost music of the evening, which is not the most gentle of musical nudges, as Bugs Bunny learned so long ago.

And that was before a bizarre little skit involving Asian kids — one that didn’t land at all — made all the talk of diversity seem weirdly hollow. Cutting the skit could have provided enough time for the explanation of the law on honor killings, for instance.

The awards themselves were spread out from the beginning. Spotlight grabbed one early for its original screenplay, then awards followed for The Big Short for its adapted screenplay, The Revenant for its cinematography, Alicia Vikander of The Danish Girl for supporting actress.

The contender that started piling up awards, in fact, was Mad Max: Fury Road, for its hugely stylish production design, makeup, costumes, film editing, sound editing and sound mixing. The film had six Oscars before the halfway point of the broadcast. Given the fact that nobody really believed Mad Max was going to win Best Picture (and it even lost the visual effects prize to Ex Machina), this mishmash kept an early favorite from running away with the show, which was at least something of a bulwark against boredom.

Later, Bridge Of Spies‘ Mark Rylance won as best supporting actor, continuing the wealth-spreading.

In the big categories handed out in the last push, Brie Larson won lead actress for Room, The Revenant won for its director, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, and its lead actor, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Spotlight, directed by Tom McCarthy, won best picture.

As always, there were segments that seemed like pointless filler designed to ensure the thing wouldn’t be brought in on time, like a needless walk-on by the Star Wars droids that elicited little response on Twitter, at least, other than from people who enjoyed watching Room‘s Jacob Tremblay get excited about it. (See also: Minions.)

There were surprises — a lot of folks expected to see Sylvester Stallone win best supporting actor for Creed and watched him lose to Rylance. And it’s surprising to hear any particularly affecting staging of a nominated song given how lackluster they often are, but Lady Gaga’s performance of “Til It Happens To You” from the documentary The Hunting Ground — a performance introduced by Vice President Joe Biden — got instant praise. And The Revenant director Inarritu, winning best director for the second year in a row, managed to defeat the band that tried to play him off as he expressed his hope for a world without prejudice.

Rock will take criticism for some jokes and be praised for others, but at the very least, he paid sustained attention for three and a half hours, in front of a very large audience, to issues of inclusiveness in the academy and in Hollywood as applied to black people. It’s about three hours and 25 minutes more than some hosts would have paid before moving on to something else, and if it was uncomfortable at times, then perhaps that’s the downside of coming to the end of the era in which you could nominate 20 actors, have all of them be white, and expect that not to make your ceremony uncomfortable.

‘Spotlight’ Wins The Oscar For Best Picture At 2016 Academy Awards


Cast and crew of "Spotlight" accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.i

Cast and crew of “Spotlight” accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Cast and crew of "Spotlight" accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Cast and crew of “Spotlight” accept the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Spotlight won the coveted Oscar for best picture when the 88th Academy Awards were handed out Sunday night in Hollywood, upsetting The Revenant and Mad Max: Fury Road, which entered the night with 12 and 10 nominations, respectively.

Mad Max: Fury Road just about swept the early categories, winning seven Oscars, but The Revenant also took two of the top awards. Alejandro González Iñárritu won the prize for best director, giving him his second consecutive Oscar, and Leonardo DiCaprio won the Oscar for best actor in a leading role, his first.

Brie Larson won her first Oscar, taking the award for best leading actress, for her role in Room. Best supporting actress went to Alicia Vikander for The Danish Girl, and best supporting actor was won by Mark Rylance for his role in Bridge of Spies.

Our Pop Culture Happy Hour team of Linda Holmes, Glen Weldon, Stephen Thompson and Bob Mondello live-tweeted allthe proceedings — from the red carpet to host Chris Rock’s opening monologue, until the last winner was called.

Our crew tweeted using the hashtag #NPROscars and we also retweeted some of your contributions, as well. You can review via the widget below, or right here on Twitter.

This year’s event is not without some controversy. When the nominations were announced on Jan. 14, several media outlets reported a lack of diversity among the nominees. Some celebrities even called for viewers to boycott Sunday’s airing of the Academy Awards, and the overall outrage over the exclusion of people of color got the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trending on Twitter.

These reactions ultimately led the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to make modifications to its voting process and declare, “The Board’s goal is to commit to doubling the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020.”

Host Chris Rock didn’t shy away from commenting on the issue in his opening monologue. He joked that the Oscars are otherwise known as “The White People Choice Awards” and said that if hosts were nominated he won’t have got the job, that it would have instead gone to Neil Patrick Harris.

In the list below, we’ve marked the winners in each category, in bold.

Categories

Picture

The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight

Actor in a Leading Role

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Matt Damon, The Martian
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

Director

Adam McKay, The Big Short
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant
Lenny Abrahamson, Room
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale, The Big Short
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Rooney Mara, Carol
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

Animated Feature Film

Anomalisa
Boy and the World
Inside Out
Shaun the Sheep Movie
When Marnie Was There

Cinematography

Carol
The Hateful Eight
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Sicario

Costume Design

Carol
Cinderella
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant

Documentary (Feature)

Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom

Documentary (Short Subject)

Body Team 12
Chau, beyond the Lines
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Last Day of Freedom

Film Editing

The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Foreign Language Film

Embrace of the Serpent
Mustang
Son of Saul
Theeb
A War

Makeup and Hairstyling

Mad Max: Fury Road
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out
the Window and Disappeared
The Revenant

Original Score

Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Original Song

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction
“Simple Song #3,” Youth
“Til It Happens To You,” The Hunting Ground
“Writing’s On The Wall,” Spectre

Production Design

Bridge of Spies
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant

Short Film (Animated)

Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow

Short Film (Live-Action)

Ave Maria
Day One
Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)
Shok
Stutterer

Sound Editing

Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Sound Mixing

Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Visual Effects

Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

The Big Short
Brooklyn
Carol
The Martian
Room

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Bridge of Spies
Ex Machina
Inside Out
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton

Oscars 2016: Follow Along With NPR’s Live-Blog


Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.i

Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Host Chris Rock speaks at the Oscars on Sunday at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

The 88th Academy Awards are being handed out Sunday night in Hollywood, and when they are, our Pop Culture Happy Hour team will be at the ready. Linda Holmes, Glen Weldon, Stephen Thompson and Bob Mondello are live-tweeting the proceedings — from the red carpet to host Chris Rock’s opening monologue, until the last winner’s called.

Think of it as a live-blog that you can take part in, too. Our crew will be tweeting as the ceremony goes on, using the hashtag #NPROscars, and we may retweet some of your contributions, as well. Follow along below, or right here on Twitter.

This year’s event is not without some controversy. When the nominations were announced on Jan. 14, several media outlets reported a lack of diversity among the nominees. Some celebrities even called for viewers to boycott Sunday’s airing of the Academy Awards, and the overall outrage over the exclusion of people of color got the hashtag #OscarsSoWhite trending on Twitter.

These reactions ultimately led the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to make modifications to its voting process and declare, “The Board’s goal is to commit to doubling the number of women and diverse members of the Academy by 2020.”

But while some might not be attending or watching, lots of attention will be paid to The Revenant — which got 12 nominations — to see if it will capture the coveted best picture Oscar. Many eyes will also be on Leonardo DiCaprio for his leading role in the film, to see if he will finally cop that elusive best actor Oscar.

Check back in as the night goes on. In the list below, we will mark the winners as they’re announced in each category, in bold.

Categories

Picture

The Big Short
Bridge of Spies
Brooklyn
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Room
Spotlight

Actor in a Leading Role

Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
Matt Damon, The Martian
Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

Actress in a Leading Role

Cate Blanchett, Carol
Brie Larson, Room
Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

Director

Adam McKay, The Big Short
George Miller, Mad Max: Fury Road
Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Revenant
Lenny Abrahamson, Room
Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale, The Big Short
Tom Hardy, The Revenant
Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
Mark Rylance, Bridge of Spies
Sylvester Stallone, Creed

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
Rooney Mara, Carol
Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

Animated Feature Film

Anomalisa
Boy and the World
Inside Out
Shaun the Sheep Movie
When Marnie Was There

Cinematography

Carol
The Hateful Eight
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Sicario

Costume Design

Carol
Cinderella
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant

Documentary (Feature)

Amy
Cartel Land
The Look of Silence
What Happened, Miss Simone?
Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom

Documentary (Short Subject)

Body Team 12
Chau, beyond the Lines
Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah
A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness
Last Day of Freedom

Film Editing

The Big Short
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Revenant
Spotlight
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Foreign Language Film

Embrace of the Serpent
Mustang
Son of Saul
Theeb
A War

Makeup and Hairstyling

Mad Max: Fury Road
The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out
the Window and Disappeared
The Revenant

Original Score

Bridge of Spies
Carol
The Hateful Eight
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Original Song

“Earned It,” Fifty Shades of Grey
“Manta Ray,” Racing Extinction
“Simple Song #3,” Youth
“Til It Happens To You,” The Hunting Ground
“Writing’s On The Wall,” Spectre

Production Design

Bridge of Spies
The Danish Girl
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant

Short Film (Animated)

Bear Story
Prologue
Sanjay’s Super Team
We Can’t Live without Cosmos
World of Tomorrow

Short Film (Live-Action)

Ave Maria
Day One
Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)
Shok
Stutterer

Sound Editing

Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Sicario
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Sound Mixing

Bridge of Spies
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Visual Effects

Ex Machina
Mad Max: Fury Road
The Martian
The Revenant
Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Writing (Adapted Screenplay)

The Big Short
Brooklyn
Carol
The Martian
Room

Writing (Original Screenplay)

Bridge of Spies
Ex Machina
Inside Out
Spotlight
Straight Outta Compton